Carp in your bathtub and other Czech traditionsCarp in your bathtub and other Czech traditions
Christmas across Europe

Carp in your bathtub and other Czech traditions

It’s the evening of December 24th, and one’s immediate family are sitting down to the Christmas Eve meal, the highlight of the festive season.It’s the evening of December 24th, and one’s immediate family are sitting down to the Christmas Eve meal, the highlight of the festive season.
It’s the evening of December 24th, and one’s immediate family are sitting down to the Christmas Eve meal, the highlight of the festive season.
For the more squeamish, the carp seller would kill and skin it for you.
Despite December 24th being known as “generous day” (Štědrý den), many Czechs still fast until the evening meal.
The next day, St. Stephen’s Day sees more of the same and (in pre-pandemic days) door-to-door carolling, as well as unbroken repeats of famed fairy-tale movies, including the ever-popular The Proud Princess.
For many, American consumerism is the second assault.
We want to keep Czech traditions.
A study by the GfK market research institute in 2016 found that 31 per cent of Czechs said they planned to go to the Midnight Mass on December 24th.
In the week or so before December 24th, the streets of most large Czech towns and cities are lined with tanks of carp, bubbling away so that customers can choose their preferred fish.